4 Ways to Minimize Chronic Pain at Bedtime

4 Ways to Minimize Chronic Pain at Bedtime

Does your chronic pain keep you up at night? If so, you are not alone! Many people suffer from sleep insomnia due to their chronic pain issues. This is because during the day, you are distracted by work, family, friends, etc. However, when you lie down to sleep, you are deprived of many of these distractions, which makes it easier to focus on your pain.

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How to Help Others Understand Chronic Pain

Here are some ways to help increase understanding about the challenges of chronic pain:

  1. Know What You Want to Say  

    People who are looking for a job or pitching a business proposition are often advised to have a brief synopsis ready to describe themselves or their idea. Called an elevator speech or an elevator pitch, this conversation is usually about 30 seconds. Try adapting this idea to your chronic pain experience as you meet new friends or see opportunities to increase others' understanding. It's a quick way to boost awareness without getting too bogged down in the details.

  2. Help Others With Chronic Pain  

    Do you have a friend who has chronic pain as well and could benefit from a support group, but is reluctant to give it a try? Invite him or her to join you. Going with a friend to a support group meeting may make your friend more comfortable about attending.

  3. Join an Advocacy Group

    Advocacy organizations for a number of chronic pain conditions hold fundraisers and other events throughout the year. Checking these organizations' websites and Facebook pages can help you stay up-to-date on events.

  4. Spread the Word

    You could ask to set up a table and distribute brochures at a pain management open house, book-signing, or demonstrations of yoga or acupuncture to help others understand.

As you reach out to help others understand chronic pain, continue to expand your knowledge with us! We offer many educational articles on our website!

3 Techniques for Coping with Chronic Sciatica

1. Disassociation

As you likely know by now, the location of your sciatica symptoms can vary based on which of your sciatic nerve roots is pinched or irritated. This means it’s possible to experience symptoms in a variety of places, such as your calf, foot, or hamstring (and symptoms may be experienced in multiple locations at once).

Regardless of the location of your symptoms, you may find relief by imagining that a painful part of your body is separated from the rest of your body (a mental practice known as disassociation).

For example, picture your numb foot on the dresser located on the other side of your room. You can then tell your foot (or whichever body part is experiencing symptoms) to stay where it is (as you continue to hold this mental picture in your mind).

When your first start out, you can hold a particular image in your mind for as little, or as long, as you like. If possible, it is also a good idea to locate a dark, secluded room in order to practice the dissociation technique.


2. Biofeedback

Biofeedback refers to the process of using a monitoring machine (often a computer) to retrain physical states in your body that are not normally under voluntary control. Put another way, biofeedback measures a physical process, and then immediately reports the information to the person being monitored so that he or she can learn to consciously influence that physical state.

Biofeedback is used to train people to do such things as lower their heart rate, decrease muscle tension, and lower their blood pressure.

If your sciatica is provoked by muscle tension in your lower back, biofeedback treatment may help bring you relief by training you to reduce the tension and allowing your mind to focus away from your symptoms.

Biofeedback training for muscle tension involves placing electrodes on the skin over the area of the muscle that needs to be retrained. The computer can then measure the amount of muscle electrical activity that is present (this electrical activity is related to the tension in the muscle). On the computer screen, you will be able to see the amount of tension present in the muscle, and then you can slowly learn to decrease it.

3. Enjoy your favorite activity

It might seem too simple, but regularly engaging in your favorite hobby or activity can reduce your perception of your chronic sciatica pain. This is possible because your attention is drawn away from your chronic pain, and instead is placed on the pleasurable task at hand.

You may no longer be able to run a marathon or go mountain biking, but you can likely still engage in simple tasks like writing poetry or reading a good book. Another option is to call a good friend on the phone at least once a week.

As a final word on this technique, we often tell patients that when their pain is at its worst, the last thing you should do is give up on your hobbies. This is not only because engaging in hobbies can reduce your perception of your chronic pain, but it also places you at greater risk for developing depression.

Want some more information on coping with sciatica? Visit our website today! 

CBD Oil and Arthritis

Recent studies suggest that cannabidiol oil could play a role in the treatment of arthritis. Here at Integrated Pain Solutions, we want to present you with all the facts! Continue reading to learn the benefits of CBD Oil in regards to arthritis.  

What Is It?

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, also called hemp oil, contains CBD extracts from cannabis plants. Some people use CBD oil to relieve pain associated with chronic conditions, such as arthritis.

CBD oil is the oil derived from hemp, which is a type of cannabis plant. CBD is a type of cannabinoid, which is a chemical that occurs naturally in cannabis plants and is not a psychoactive chemical.

How it Works

CBD may help manage chronic pain by affecting the brain's response to pain signals. Cannabinoids, such as CBD, attach themselves to specialized receptors in a person's brain and immune system. One of these receptors, called a CB2 receptor, plays a role in the immune system by managing pain and inflammation.

Researchers believe that when CBD enters a person's body, it may attach to CB2 receptors. Alternatively, it may cause the body to produce natural cannabinoids that attach to the CB2 receptors. Either way, scientists think CBD affects the way that these receptors respond to the signals that they receive, possibly helping reduce inflammation and pain.

CBD Oil and Arthritis

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, affecting over 50 million Americans. The two most common types of arthritis are:

· Rheumatoid arthritis (RA): An autoimmune disease in which a person's immune system attacks their joints, causing inflammation. RA commonly affects the hands and feet and leads to painful, swollen, and stiff joints.

· Osteoarthritis (OA): A degenerative disease that affects joint cartilage and bones, causing pain and stiffness. It often affects the hip, knee, and thumb joints.

Some studies on animals suggest that CBD could help treat arthritis and relieve the associated inflammatory pain:

· A 2011 study found that CBD helped to reduce inflammatory pain in rats by affecting the way that pain receptors respond to stimuli.

· A 2014 review of the existing body of research on animals concluded that CBD may be an effective treatment for OA.

· A 2016 study found that the topical application of CBD had the potential to relieve pain and inflammation associated with arthritis.

· A 2017 study found that CBD might be a safe and useful treatment for OA joint pain.

While findings so far have been encouraging, more research is necessary to confirm that CBD oil is an effective treatment for arthritis pain. Are you interested in trying CBD to help manage your chronic pain? Give us a call today at 844-939-7246!

What is a Sympathetic Ganglion Block?

What is a Sympathetic Ganglion Block?

A Sympathetic Ganglion Block is a type of nerve block used to treat severe or chronic pain. A ganglion, the affected bundle of nerves, is injected with anesthetic to halt pain. These nerves help the body react to stress and are responsible for the fight-or-flight response.

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